Home Forums General Discussion Jonathan Coe & the music

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #568
    toompea
    Member

    I remember the very first time I read The Rotter’s Club. it was long time ago and in those days I was really into The Sigur Ros, a mesmerizing icelandic band. I remember reading the book along with their ‘Ágætis byrjun’ and for some reasons they did fit!
    of course I’ve been extremely lucky to read the most poignant moments of the novel while the songs were touching the most evocative notes.
    anyway, since then to me The Rotter’s Club is ‘Ágætis byrjun’ and viceversa.
    yours?

    #789
    gert-van
    Member

    An impressive album with an impressive novel. Sigur Ros is indeed amazing…
    Another thing about music: All my respect for these Smiths epigraphs at the beginning of each chapter in Dwarves of Death! It was a pleasant surprise when I first opened the book.

    #791
    toompea
    Member

    I definitely agree with you! I’m a huge Smiths fan and mind that the italian title of The Dwarves of Death is This Night Has Opened My Eyes 😉
    great!
    I’m also planing to make a compilation of all the songs mentioned in all of his novels, we’ll see…

    #793
    gert-van
    Member

    Including Hathfield & The North and stuff? 😀 Cool!

    #796
    toompea
    Member

    including EVERYTHING 🙂

    #820
    uppa
    Member

    There’s a band that makes me think of Jonathan’s books even though it is not the type of music that I think he’d listen to. It’s Chumbawamba.
    To put it very simply, they’re an anarchist band from Leeds who became famous a few years ago with the enjoyable, but certainly not their best effort, Tubthumping, and then cut down on the line-up and went back into chart oblivion to produce some real masterpieces.
    The reason why my mind connects their work to Jonathan is because both have the same effect on me: they entertain me and move me, they make me laugh and cry, they make me dance and think.
    Chumbawamba’s songs sound simpler than they really are: their catchy folksy melodies are the background to stories of social injustice and of political engagement but also to tales of everyday lives, where tragedy is challenged by comedy, where disgust and complaint for certain situations is often counterbalanced by an innate optimism. Even musically they are never banal; in spite of the usually comparatively simple chord sequences, they create wonderful harmonies with their voices (with many a cappella songs) and encompass many musical genres often with just the help of two guitars, an accordion and a trumpet or a recorder. There’s so much more than meets the eye.
    I also thought of them the last time I heard Jonathan speak about M. Thatcher… I nearly suggested he booked their In Memoriam EP, which will get to the buyers on the morning of the glorious day she dies. I heard a preview when I saw them live…
    I felt the urge to write this after I was nearly moved to tears this morning. I was walking to school with Chumbawamba on my ipod and I saw two ducks having a bath in a city stream with the early morning sun in the background. It was like reading some of Jonathan’s pages, a short-circuit of emotions.
    If you want to see something on youtube, I love this one in spite of its live imperfections (it’s from when I saw them in Milan) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axr8fW4omG8, though this is more appropriate to things that are being said in Italy these days http://www.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DmO … -E&h=410e6

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.